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Long term seasonal and annual changes in rainfall duration and magnitude in Luvuvhu River Catchment, South Africa

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dc.contributor.advisor Odiyo, J. O.
dc.contributor.advisor Makungo R.
dc.contributor.author Mashinye, Mosedi Deseree
dc.date 2018
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-07T13:35:43Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-07T13:35:43Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05-18
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11602/1152
dc.description MESHWR
dc.description Department of Hydrology and Water Resources
dc.description.abstract This study was aimed at investigating the long term seasonal and annual changes in rainfall duration and magnitude at Luvuvhu River Catchment (LRC). Rainfall in this catchment is highly variable and is characterised of extreme events which shift runoff process, affect the timing and magnitude of floods and drought, and alter groundwater recharge. This study was motivated by the year to year changes of rainfall which have some effects on the availability of water resources. Computed long term total seasonal, annual rainfall and total number of seasonal rainy days were used to identify trends for the period of 51 years (1965- 2015), using Mann Kendal (MK), linear regression (LR) and quantile regression methods. The MK, LR and quantile regression methods have indicated dominance of decreasing trends of the annual, seasonal rainfall and duration of seasonal rainfall although they were not statistically significant. However, statistical significant decreasing trends in duration of seasonal rainfall were identified by MK and LR at Matiwa, Palmaryville, Levubu, and Entabeni Bos stations only. Quantile regression identified the statistically significant decreasing trends on 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 quantiles only in the Palmaryville, Levubu and Entabeni Bos, respectively. Stations with non-statistically significant decreasing trends of annual and seasonal rainfall had magnitude of change ranging from 0.12 to 12.31 and 0.54 to 6.72 mm, respectively. Stations with non-statistically increasing trends of annual and seasonal rainfall magnitude had positive magnitude of change ranging from 1.51 to 6.78 and 2.05 to 6.51 mm, respectively. The Study recommended further studies using other approaches to determine the duration of rainfall to improve, update and compare the results obtained in the current study. Continuous monitoring and installation of rain gauges are recommended on the lower reaches of the catchment for the findings to be of complete picture for the whole catchment and to also minimize the rainfall gaps in the stations. Water resources should be used in a sustainable way to avoid water crisis risk in the next generations. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NRF en_US
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (ix, 94 leaves : color illustrations, maps)
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights University of Venda
dc.subject Long term seasonal en_US
dc.subject Annual changes en_US
dc.subject Rainfall duration en_US
dc.subject Luvuvhu River en_US
dc.subject Rainfall en_US
dc.subject Catchment en_US
dc.subject Floods en_US
dc.subject Groundwater en_US
dc.subject.ddc 551.57730968257
dc.subject.lcsh Rain and rainfall -- South Africa -- Limpopo
dc.subject.lcsh Rain frequencies -- South Africa -- Limpopo
dc.subject.lcsh Rain probabilities -- South Africa -- Limpopo
dc.subject.lcsh Rainfall intensity duration frequencies -- South Africa -- Limpopo
dc.subject.lcsh Luvuvhu River Watersheds (South Africa)
dc.title Long term seasonal and annual changes in rainfall duration and magnitude in Luvuvhu River Catchment, South Africa en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US


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